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Money: Burning a Hole in Your Pocket or Heart?
Aug 29, 2017

Money: Burning a Hole in Your Pocket or Heart?

“No one can serve two masters, for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and money.” Matthew 6:24


Your money can be a blessing; on the other hand, it can be a curse.
Your money and possessions will certainly produce a running battle between you and God in determining who your master is. You may constantly profess your master as God, but can your words and actions be regularly put to the test to prove your testimony genuine? Money can be a besetting sin, or it can be a significant blessing from God to many people. Money purchases the necessities of life, it feeds the hungry, it clothes the destitute. It also goes beyond the basics of life. It gives us far more than we deserve; like the lilies of the field or the sparrows of the air, you are beautifully adorned and cared for by a loving Master!
But the “love of money,” the obsession for it, the all-in pursuit of more and more, becomes the root of “all” evil and leads men and women, like a noose in the nose into deleterious pursuits and degradation of your spirit. The misuse of money corrupts the soul. Money has the capacity to separate you from God; it can do malicious things to your being, to your heart.
Money is necessary. In itself, it is the means of sustenance for living, for sustaining you in those things which make up life on this earth. In this commercial life of the modern age especially, money is the means of trade for what you eat, where you live, your transport, business and work, leisure, supporting children and family, education, and charitable endeavors to assist others. Money is involved with most every activity of life.
But it can be both blessing and curse. Money must be seen with a godly perspective. God reminds you of this necessity by requiring a tithe. His tithe brings the proper use and perspective of money before your mind. It calls for the organization of your money assets, the budgeting of your money in order for you to be responsible for your obligations, and to be accountable to God, to others, and yourself. How can you determine what 10% is unless you organize it to determine what you have? Money managed in a godly way becomes a great blessing both to you and to others, your neighbor to whom you owe godly service.
The Scripture tells you that “God loves a cheerful giver.” The following implication is as you give your money cheerfully and generously, it produces in you a cheerful heart, which in turn is the very essence of living joyfully. Such is a good definition of abundant living.
It begins with the fervent recognition that your money is not your own. Really? Really! All you have comes from God. He has blessed you with what you possess to use it wisely to bring glory to Him, and in that use, bless others. You are the primary steward of your money and possessions for which you must give account. The parable Jesus tells of the master giving talents (money) in various amounts to his servants to manage until he returns is an indicator that God blesses us each according to his own counsel. Some are blessed with more, and some with less. How it is managed is the real test of whether or not the master (God) is pleased. The servant who buries his talent is the one who is punished as an unworthy servant. Burial of the talent is most likely an indicator that this servant used his talent exclusively for himself and not for the glory of his master and the blessing of others in investing and increasing its worth to further just such a goal.
Do not allow your money to burn a hole in your pocket through mismanagement, that is, by not using it for His glory and truly blessing others. If you do, you also burn a hole in your heart. Your real treasure which captivates your heart is either God, with your money used to His end, or your money, used to please yourself. You cannot serve God, of first order, and your money in His place. Use your money to bring Him glory. He will bring honor to you if you do.


“All that I am I owe to thee. Thy wisdom, Lord, has fashioned me. I give my Maker thankful praise, whose wondrous works my soul amaze.”
(1st verse of The Psalter,1912, Psalm 139:14-24)
 

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A Priceless Gift
Aug 29, 2017

A Priceless Gift

Every holiday and special occasion, I struggle to find the perfect gifts for my loved ones. I am not a naturally good gift giver, but I very much want to be, and the tension between those two realities can be stressful. I go back and forth debating whether or not the gift in question is adequate. Will they like it? Can they use it? Is this just going to end up in the back of their closet or for purchase at their next yard sale? But more than all of that, the most prominent question lingering in my mind is Will they know how much they mean to me when they open this gift? I want to give them a gift that makes them feel loved and appreciated. I want them to know they are priceless to me.
Money is a funny thing. It has monetary value here on Earth, but it can, when used correctly, supersede the realm of this life. And when it does, it is worth more than any price we could place on it. When we spend our money on things of eternal value, we truly make a priceless investment. These are the most important investments we can make, as they are the only ones that will stand the test of time.

Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moths and vermin destroy, and where thieves break in and steal. But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where moths and vermin do not destroy, and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.  

– Matthew 6:19-21

In his book The Treasure Principle, which is based on the scripture above, Randy Alcorn discusses six “Treasure Principle Keys that teach us how to be good stewards of the money God has given us:

  1. God owns everything; I’m simply his money manager. We are the managers of the assets God has entrusted – not given – to us. It’s easy to fall into the pattern of considering it “my money because we feel like we work hard and earn it. The reality is that God has given each of us the gifts and strengths we use to make money. We would not have the ability to do so without His gracious giftings, and when He allows us to make money or when He blesses us with financial gifts, He is entrusting it to us to use for His glory.
  1. My heart always goes where I put God’s money.  Does it stress you out when your kids spill their juice and stain your expensive white carpet? It’s probably because you have invested good money in it, so you want to take good care of it. That’s what happens when we spend money – our affections go along with it. If we start putting our money towards eternal things, our hearts will be more invested in eternity.
  1. Heaven – the New Earth, not the present one – is my home.  (Hebrews 11:16) My husband and I live in an old rental house. I am often tempted to spend a lot of money on new features to make it feel a little nicer, but every time I start to, I remind myself that we aren’t going to live in this house forever. It doesn’t make sense to invest a lot of money in a house that isn’t our permanent home. When we move from this house, we will be leaving whatever improvements we have made. They can’t go with us to our next home. The same is true for our spiritual lives. This Earth is our rental house, and we won’t be here long. We will spend eternity in Heaven, our permanent home, so that’s what we should invest our money in.
  1. Live for the eternal, not the temporary. Alcorn says, “We’ll each part with our money. The only question is when. We have no choice but to part with it later. But we do have a choice to part with it now. We can keep earthly treasures for the moment, and we may derive some temporary enjoyment from them, but if we give them away, we’ll enjoy eternal treasures that will never be taken away from us.
  1. Giving is the only antidote to materialism. Giving is a joyful surrender to a greater person and a greater agenda. It dethrones us and exalts Him. When we give, it says, “It’s all about you, God; not me. It recognizes that God’s money has a higher purpose than our affluence. Giving doesn’t rid us of the things we care about; it shifts our perspective and causes us to care about eternal things.
  1. God prospers me not to raise my standard of living, but to raise my standard of giving. God gives us more money than we need so we can give generously. Because God gives so generously to us, we are free to give generously in return because we know He will provide for us. He doesn’t bless us abundantly so that we can live in the biggest house, drive the nicest car, and wear the newest clothes. He does so to enable us to give!

I’m reminded of the feeding of the 5,000. A young boy gave the small amount of food he had, and Christ used it to feed a multitude. Of course Christ didn’t need a thing from anyone in order to feed the crowd – He could have done it without the little boy. Similarly, He doesn’t need our help or our money to accomplish His purposes, but He chooses to involve us in His miracles and gives us a chance to bless others and become an answer to their prayers. It’s an extraordinary, priceless opportunity that we shouldn’t pass up!


A changed life is priceless


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2017 Bike Ride Photos
Aug 25, 2017

2017 Bike Ride Photos

We offer a fresh start for troubled teenagers who need to change their lives and have reached a “dead end. Every year we set out on a journey to cover 500+ miles with the purpose of spreading awareness of the PAYH and giving our young men an opportunity to experience something that they never dreamed possible as we build generations of strong families.

[tribulant_slideshow gallery_id=”1″]


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Is Your Treasure Worth All It Is Cracked Up to Be?
Aug 23, 2017

Is Your Treasure Worth All It Is Cracked Up to Be?

“Do not lay up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy and where thieves break in and steal, but lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth or rust destroys and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.” Matthew 6:19-21


In 2010, a New Mexican art collector and author of some worth, Forrest Fenn, allegedly put a nearly $2 million treasure in a ten inch by ten inch bronze box and hid it somewhere in New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Utah, or Wyoming – basically, one BIG area: the Rocky Mountains. Some 65,000 treasure hunters have seriously tried to follow the clues Fenn embedded in a poem he authored along with the consequent annual clues he has written about where the treasure is hidden. These searchers have hiked and scoured over countless acres of rugged terrain. Fenn swears to the lucrative contents in the box. This treasure hunt has caused hundreds of articles to be written and television accounts produced. At least two hunters have died searching. One unfortunate hunter’s body was found in 2016, another in June 2017. How much does searching for or finding corruptible treasure mean to you?
There are a number of missing real or mythical treasures of legend in the United States, under the sea, and in far flung places. Hunters still seek them. Most ordinary as well as wealthy people have treasures of which they actually know the location, ranging from a thousand to billions of dollars which they keep variously in cupboards, mattresses, banks, stocks and bonds, jewelry, collectors’ items, real estate, and countless other places. All are, nevertheless, susceptible to accidental destruction, market crashes, bank failures, real estate downturns, or deflation.
Those who currently feel somewhat financially secure are also susceptible themselves to failing health, fatal disease, advancing age, and an increasing, inevitable inability to enjoy their wealth stockpiled for an uncertain future. The evidence is clear: Material treasure does not always ensure a happy future, especially beyond a personal and certain grave date. Some big lottery winners and many others who have come into wealth have found that “easy come, easy go” is not just a mythical saying.
Yet all this assumes the definition of “treasure” always refers to a material substance translatable to money. The question for all of us is this: Is there treasure which can never be diminished or destroyed? You might not take his word for it, but Jesus clearly says there is a treasure which can never be stolen from you or suffer any destructive element. The bank for such treasure is not on this earth; it is in a place located beyond the erosion of the grave, a place you who are still living have not yet seen. So do you grab the treasure you can lay your hands on here, added up on a calculator, grasping it as close to your heart as possible? Or do you take the word of the Lord of this universe and trust what he says about permanent treasure? Do you invest countless hours making and hoarding losable treasure or yearning and searching for the proverbial pot at the end of the rainbow? Or do your put your whole-hearted effort into building a permanent treasure which traverses eternity?
Working for this treasure promises oases of pleasure along the way as you see lives rescued, people restored and healed, your money applied to help others survive, to see with your own eyes the glowing smile appear on a once tear stained face. Building this treasure requires your own hands, your own time, and your own heart to be engaged, where normally it must be subtracted from any effort to seek and gain a treasure which ultimately erodes into oblivion.
This is a life-transforming consideration to which you must apply your mind, sooner rather than later, for none of us knows when our time will come. According to Scripture, “Blessed is the man who wisely considers the poor man’s case.” Think wisely before the love of money captures your heart.


“Worldlings prize their gems of beauty, cling to gilded toys of dust, boast of wealth and fame and pleasure; only Jesus will I trust. All for Jesus! All for Jesus! Only Jesus will I trust. All for Jesus! All for Jesus! Only Jesus will I trust.”
(3rd verse of Mary James’ hymn “All for Jesus,” 1871)
 

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A Priceless Investment
Aug 22, 2017

A Priceless Investment

“For what will it profit a man if he gains the whole world, and loses his own soul? – Mark 8:36
When asked by a reporter “What would you be worth if you hadn’t given so much money to charity? the late George Jenkins short and simple answer – “Nothing. Why did he answer this way?
Born in 1907, Jenkins began as a clerk at a Piggly Wiggly supermarket at the age of 17, and quickly worked his way up to a manager’s position. He was efficient and motivated, and sales in the store he managed quadrupled within a year.  However, when the great depression hit, the store he managed was sold.  Things were difficult under the new owner, and Jenkins decided to simply start his own business instead, incorporating under the name “Publix Food Stores. The first year was hard, but after the competing Piggly Wiggly closed, business boomed and he began to open new locations. Thus, a supermarket giant was born, and Publix remains a top player in the supermarket industry today.
One of the drivers of Jenkins’ success was the investment policy he implemented on behalf of his employees. He believed that workers who were invested in the company would be incentivized to see it succeed, and implemented a system in which his associates (he didn’t call them “employees) accumulated stock in the company and shared in its profits.
Just as Publix associates were better motivated because they had a stake in the company, we are better motivated to see a cause succeed when we invest in it directly. This is doubly true when investing in God’s kingdom, which yields a return in this life and the next. When you invest your time, efforts, and finances into ministry, you invest in something priceless, because the profits from your investment will pay dividends for eternity.
So why did Mr. Jenkins answer the reporter’s question the way he did? George Jenkins understood the value of an eternal investment, giving millions to charity over his lifetime. In the words of Jim Elliot, he gave up “what he cannot keep, to gain what he cannot lose, and his investment in God’s kingdom continues to pay off. He knew that a changed life is priceless, that material wealth isn’t everything, and that while he could have kept more money for himself, in the end it would have been worth nothing.


A changed life is priceless


Want to give a priceless gift by investing in the lives of others? God has been changing the lives of young men and their families at PAYH for more than 56 years.

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Doing It to Be Seen by Others
Aug 16, 2017

Doing It to Be Seen by Others

“Be careful not to do your acts of righteousness before men, to be seen by them. If you do, you will have no reward from your Father in heaven.” Matthew 6:1


There is a constant competition among a certain group of men from which most people are excluded because they simply do not make enough money to come close. However, the old boys’ club is being overcome by some “Johnny come latelies” to the “Who Is the Richest Man in the World Club,” that is, determining who is richest today based on stock market vicissitudes. Namely, Bill Gates, Warren Buffet, Amancio Ortega, Carlos Slim Helu, et al. getting a run for their money by newcomers Jeff Bezos and Mark Zuckerburg for now. The Walmart family might have been somewhat in the running, but founder Sam Walton split his assets among all his children, so they have slid down the ladder.
These very wealthy men have differing personalities, but they share a few similarities, nonetheless; chiefly, they enjoy being seen by men. Although these men most likely downplay this truth, it is nevertheless there. Their familiarity before the world is an important part of what their vast accumulated treasures – and the acclamation of men because of it – bring them.
All of the Lord’s teaching of Matthew 6 is prefaced by this truth: You should take extraordinary measures not to perform your acts of righteousness (or display your great success) before men so as to seek their praise as one of your great rewards. Your wealth-status in life is not from your own hand but from the blessing of Almighty God. Always remember this fact of life and give God the glory due alone to Him! Do not seek to accumulate glory to yourself as though God has done nothing for you and you alone have accomplished all this by your extraordinary skills, which you consider far exceed most others.
The great moral lesson of Matthew 6 extends from the truth that we ought not be focused in our hearts on the adulation of men by what we accumulate or what we do to draw such personal glory and popularity from others. We ought to be of first order seeking the approval and affirmation of God and not determining our course in life upon whether or not it is popular with men. God’s affirmation of your righteousness is on a different plane than the judgment of men and counts eternally, not temporarily. As the Apostle Paul says, our own accumulations of notoriety are as filthy rags in comparison to the rewards and affirmation of God.
None of us compete with the richest men in the world, and I doubt any of them will read this, but what blessings we do have are from our gracious God and not from our own hands. By seeking our primary treasure in accumulated things destined for destruction, we show what our hearts treasure more than God. The monied treasures of our hearts are the things that ultimately perish, rather than the rewards of obedience to the commands and instruction of God and His Son.
God may well bless you with wealth, or maybe a modest income, or possibly a thread bare existence, but whatever your status is, your heart’s treasure should be the seeking of His kingdom above all. In doing this, all needful things of this world will be added into your life. In a very real sense, you will truly be the richest man or woman in the world; for having His hand upon you to do you good moves you into this realm, which eternity will certainly bear out.


“He owns the cattle on a thousand hills, the wealth in every mine; He owns the rivers and the rocks and rills, the sun and stars that shine. Wonderful riches, more than tongue can tell; He is my Father so they’re mine as well. He owns the cattle on a thousand hills; I know that He will care for me.”
(1st verse of John W. Peterson’s hymn, “He Owns the Cattle on a Thousand Hills,” 1948)
 

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A Priceless Legacy
Aug 15, 2017

A Priceless Legacy

What does it mean to leave a legacy? Have you ever thought about the world you will leave behind, or the effect your life will have upon it? Great or small, good or bad, each of us will change the world to some degree.
In his poem Ozymandias, Percy Bysshe Shelley describes what was once an imposing, colossal statue that towered above the inhabitants of a forgotten city. Now, the surrounding structures have eroded away, leaving only the sculpture itself. Though now a shattered ruin, the inscription on the pedestal can still be read – “My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair! Surrounded only by “lone and level sands the statue is a mere shadow of its former glory, yet still declares the might of the long-dead king to a barren desert.
It reads like a cautionary legend, but Ozymandias was no fictional character. “Ozymandias was the Greek name for Ramses the Great, considered by many to be the greatest and most powerful Pharaoh in Egyptian history. Ruling for 66 years, he won numerous military victories and expanded Egyptian wealth and influence to unprecedented levels. His people considered him to be a god, and nine subsequent pharaohs took the name Ramses in his honor.  In his day he was without equal, heavily influencing the future development of 3 continents.
Ramses was a great man by historical standards, but what is the eternal value of his deeds? Consider Christ’s words in his Sermon on the Mount:

“Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moths and vermin destroy, and where thieves break in and steal. But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where moths and vermin do not destroy, and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. – Matthew 6:19-21

We each “store up some form of “treasure daily. For some that means investing in savings accounts, property, retirement accounts, or other financially profitable means. For others that may be in experience, knowledge, or skill. These are good things to pursue, but the truly wise don’t invest exclusively in the things of this world.
Like most pharaohs, Ramses was buried with a great deal of wealth, but it was quickly stolen by thieves exactly as Jesus described. Even if it hadn’t, it wouldn’t do him any good. The glory of Ramses has faded, he has no further power or influence, and the empire he ruled is no more.
So what kind of legacy will you leave? Like Ramses, you can invest in earthly treasure, but over time your legacy will begin to decay. However, if you invest your life in others, and pour yourself into serving God and His kingdom, your legacy will last forever. How do you do this? The basic instructions are simple (but not necessarily easy to carry out). Invest your life in others; share the Gospel, be active in your local church, give generously to those in need, and teach others to do the same.  You may not go down in history, but the priceless legacy you leave will last forever, and the glory of Ramses will pale by comparison.
 


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The Kindness and Severity of God
Aug 09, 2017

The Kindness and Severity of God

“Note then the kindness and the severity of God: severity toward those who have fallen, but God’s kindness to you, provided you continue in His kindness. Otherwise you too will be cut off.” Romans 11:22


Achan and his family lived among the children of Israel in the wilderness of Sinai, having left Egypt in the exodus. He had a heart of deception and at the same time no conscious awareness of an all-seeing, all-knowing God who is fully cognizant of everything. When instructed by God to take no personal spoils when Israel defeated its enemy, Ai, Achan thought God’s commands foolish, taking for himself significant treasure, and burying it in his tent. He falsely thought no one but his family saw him. When he was discovered, he and his family were stoned. This was God’s justice on evil. Should God’s kindness have prevailed in this deception and Achan and his family been forgiven?
If you want to know God as He really is, in all His glory, then you must acknowledge both His kindness AND His severity. God, as well as His Son, Jesus, are not simply all-kindness all-the-time alone, especially not kindness toward persistent, unrepentant evil. God is love and the fullness of love’s definition includes both justice and forgiveness, holiness as well as salvation, righteousness as well as redemption. Authentic love is not to be relegated to the sentiment of total acceptance and full tolerance of everything and anything! This, unfortunately, is the opinion of too many.
There are 150 Psalms in the Bible’s Hymn Book. Six of them are not the favorites of many readers; they are studiously avoided. Those six are called “Imprecatory Psalms,” and many other Psalms as well have imprecatory verses in them. These are Psalms or passages in which God refers to His enemies and to the manner in which He stands against their evil intentions and behavior; He will judge severely and distribute a just punishment. A Holy God will not abide unrepentant sin; He will not allow sin to continue unabated apart from judgment.
Harsh words and expressions of punishments do not enter ears and minds easily. They may grate upon your sensitivities. They may shock a false opinion and view of God. If they do, you have not fully known Him as He is. It is necessary to understand and know Him fully, else you cannot draw near to Him. You need to draw near to God both in times of gladness and in times of discipline, just as a child will crawl into the lap of a parent after being spanked.
God acts both kindly and severely toward his children, for His truth cannot be discounted and will not be put to shame. Truth is neither relative nor random; truth, just as God Himself, does not change or erode. The denigration of truth by good or by evil people will always result in corrective action – as discipline soaked in grace from a loving Father toward His children or as justice toward rebels and unbelievers; maybe not always corrective action immediately but in God’s timing. It is a certainty to come. Falsehoods will not stand, or else chaos prevails. God is not a God of chaos but of order.
Order is one of God’s beautiful attributes. It inspires trust in Him and what He establishes. It causes doubt to flee. Order is always a foundation on which to build. Disorder discourages and affords no certain means to move forward with confidence. No man can flourish in the midst of disorder. He must know that obedience to God produces order in his life and results in success. Rebelliousness on the other hand produces disorder and the severity of God.
Take into account the kindness and severity of God in all your dealings. It is always based on the truth of who He is. He will not compromise with evil; it is anathema to Him. He will always deal with those who are in Christ, kindly with grace and mercy. Be in Christ!


“When peace like a river attendeth my way, when sorrows like sea billows roll; whatever my lot, thou hast taught me to say it is well, it is well with my soul.”
(1st verse of Horatio Spafford’s hymn, “When Peace Like a River,” 1876)
 

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I Am Not Consumed
Aug 03, 2017

I Am Not Consumed

“Because of the Lord’s great love we are not consumed, for his compassions never fail. They are new every morning; great is your faithfulness. Lamentations 3:23, 24


What is it in your life that is more consuming than anything else, that renders your life hopeless, making you question if you can go on? There is nothing more consuming than sin, and sin piled upon sin is a death spiral from which there seems no escape. The sin that has already occurred in the past has been so destructive, the results, you think, cannot possibly be remedied.
I just attended the funeral of a man who was a dear friend for most of my life. He died at 89, but except for a fall from a ladder up in a tree some ten years ago, which had a great impact on his health, it was easily expected he would live to over a 100. He always had Christ on his lips, speaking of his Lord to others as a joyful daily habit. One of his traits was to share his wonder each day while reminding others that today is a new day, a day to begin anew. God’s mercy and compassion to us is such that despite what happened yesterday, today is truly a new day. “Isn’t that amazing? he would say. This truth, as described in Lamentations, puts the lie to the thought that our sins can consume us, and no remedy or hope can be found to the situation in which we find ourselves. This thinking has driven many a Christian into the pit of despair.
Jeremiah, known as “the weeping prophet, certainly traversed some deep valleys. He was no stranger to tears, pain and misery, and being thrust into one dismal situation after another. This small book following the book named after him, Jeremiah, is after all named Lamentations, a lament. Yet there is in the midst of sorrow the promise of compassion and mercy capable of remedying any crushing situation. Some just do not believe it; so they end up spiraling down into greater despair and more sin. There is little room in them for patience for waiting quietly for God’s remedy by placing hope in Him while earnestly seeking Him (see 3:25-26). The hope and the seeking are simply absent when there is no belief in the promise.
When sin is in the process of consuming your life and you recognize it, you are faced with several options: (1) My sin is too great and my circumstance is too impossible for remedy; so I do nothing except continue in it, hoping my despair will somehow pass. (2) I want a solution immediately. I want to see the light now at the end of the tunnel. There is no place for hope or waiting. (3) I believe the Lord’s promise and put my hope in Him, seeking Him through genuine repentance and patiently waiting for His salvation, however long it takes.
When I was in Vietnam and praying to survive the year-long tour, experiencing one brush with death after another, God’s answer to my prayer could have been my getting wounded so badly it would require my removal from the battlefield immediately and being sent home, or He could display His presence to me through continuing to surround me with His mercies and protection. In this case my year would not shorten. It would remain a year of 365 days in which I would continue on the battlefield. I would have to wait patiently for the salvation of the Lord for the rest of what seemed a longer than normal year. Very often our salvation from the situation which sin has created in our life necessitates waiting patiently for what the Lord is doing or will do, a process that tests the mettle of your hope in Him. It isn’t authentic hope if you expect an immediate escape and removal of the pain of the dilemma into which your sin has thrust you. There is not a set time as my tour of a year in Vietnam. The time of waiting is in God’s hands, molding your hope into a persevering one, which is hope indeed. Some are not willing to actually put on such a character of faith and would choose to sink into greater despair or become insensitive to sin altogether. The reckoning will eventually come after the searing of the conscience has done its damage.
Sin always consumes everything in its path, but its remedy is nearer than you know. Sin will always tell you, “I have gone too far, and there is no going back. But God’s promise still rings in the ear of the hearer of His Word, “My compassions never fail, they are new every morning!


“There is a balm in Gilead to make the wounded whole, there is a balm in Gilead to heal the sin sick soul.
(Refrain from African-American spiritual taken from Jeremiah 8:22)
 

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