Payh Blog
Jan 08, 2021

Paul Anderson Youth Home Earns Accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities

Paul Anderson Youth Home Earns Accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities

CARF approval underscores the high standards of the Christ-centered youth home.

(VIDALIA, GA) Paul Anderson Youth Home (PAYH) announced they have received a three-year accreditation by CARF, an independent nonprofit organization focused on advancing the quality of services needed for the best possible results.

“We are thrilled to receive this international accreditation as it earnestly demonstrates to our families we serve, our stakeholders, and other organizations that we not only meet but exceed the industry standards,” said PAYH Vice President for Outreach and Compliance Betty Burris. Attaining this prestigious recognition is an organization-wide effort with all departments playing an important role. Burris spent the better part of two months working on it. “It shows we are committed to continually reviewing and improving our services,” she added.

CARF accreditation is based on compliance with industry standards for group homes and rehabilitation facilities. It also equips PAYH to better serve the young men in their care. Developed over 50 years ago by international service providers, policymakers, family members and consumers, CARF standards are submitted to the public for review to validate relevancy and ensure valuable input from all participants.

Among the many strengths noted in CARF’s findings are the vision and dedication of co-founder and Executive Director Glenda Anderson Leonard, described in the report as, “a dedicated, compassionate person who made a personal commitment years ago to better serve young men who were in need of a Christian approach to treatment.”

The CARF report also cited the leadership of the board of directors and the staff as, “committed, creative, and innovative; actively seeking and embracing new ideas, and demonstrating a willingness to develop and enhance the organization’s existing services.”

According to the findings, the young men served by PAYH also reported a high level of satisfaction with the program and the respect they receive in the program.

Paul Anderson Youth Home, Vidalia Georgia, accredited and licensed home offering a second chance to young men in crisis

PAYH is also accredited by the Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI), the Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability (ECFA) for fiscal transparency, Cognia for high school diploma standards, and is licensed by the Georgia Department of Human Services.

ABOUT PAUL ANDERSON YOUTH HOME
Founded in 1961 by weightlifting world champion Paul Anderson and his wife, Glenda, the Paul Anderson Youth Home (PAYH) is a Christian residential program and on-campus school for young men between the ages of 16 and 21 struggling with behavioral problems and issues of discipline, anger and depression. PAYH is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF). In addition to counseling and character development, PAYH offers an accelerated learning program enabling residents to graduate with a high school diploma and technical certifications. To date, over 1,400 young men have attended the program. The Home is located at 1603 McIntosh St. in Vidalia, GA. To learn more about PAYH, call (912) 537-7237 or visit www.payh.org.

MEDIA CONTACT
Cynthia Cradduck
Cecilia Russo Marketing
cynthia@crussomarketing.com
912-856-9075


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Paul Anderson Youth Home 2020 Christmas Family Extravaganza
Dec 09, 2020

Paul Anderson Youth Home 2020 Christmas Family Extravaganza

The Christ-centered youth home’s annual Christmas celebration raises funds, awareness and spirits.

(VIDALIA, GA) Paul Anderson Youth Home, a fully accredited and licensed home offering a second chance to young men in crisis, held their annual Christmas party at the First Baptist Church of Vidalia. In order to comply with changes due to the pandemic, the event was unlike the traditional dinner theater show. This year the evening began with a “Jingle Mingle” featuring delectable Christmas goodies and heavy hors d’oeuvres, followed by a lineup of singers, musicians, a jazz ensemble, youth choir and more.

“Our 17th annual Christmas celebration promised to be different, with a new and exciting program of entertainment,” said Glenda Anderson, Co-founder of Paul Anderson Youth Home. “And while we are excited to celebrate the Holy season, we couldn’t wait to share the mission of our ministry and remind our local community about the important work we have been doing for nearly 60 years,” she added.

Paul Anderson Youth Home staff members Eileen Whitfield (Right) and Steven Richardson (Left) perform together at the Christmas Extravaganza.

Paul Anderson Youth Home staff members Eileen Whitfield (Right) and Steven Richardson (Left) perform together at the Christmas Extravaganza.

At Paul Anderson Youth Home, the endless distractions and commercialization of Christmas are put on pause. Instead, the home celebrates the birth of Christ, slowing down the hectic nature of the season to allow a focus on its true meaning. The Christmas Family Extravaganza finds that balance of celebrating God’s gifts and having fun while supporting such a worthy cause.

The-Vidalia-Heritage-Childrens-Choir-sing-for-guests-at-the-Christmas-Extravaganza

The Vidalia Heritage Children’s Choir sing for guests at the Christmas Extravaganza.

Rev. Don Moye of First Baptist Church Vidalia curated the evening’s entertainment. Matthew Kersey, Minister of Music and Worship at Grace Community Presbyterian Church and Jeff McCormick, headmaster at Vidalia Heritage Academy, emceed the show. Performance acts included Bill Torrance as “Uncle Gus”, a piano duet with Marshia Pierce and Kathy Rogers, the Williams Family Trio, PAYH staff members Eileen Whitfield and Steven Richardson, and the Vidalia Heritage Children’s Choir. The evening closed with a special performance by members of the PAYH staff and young men.

“Uncle Gus” and a young man from the Paul Anderson Youth Home perform together at the Christmas Extravaganza.

“Uncle Gus” and a young man from the Paul Anderson Youth Home perform together at the Christmas Extravaganza.

As we gather together to celebrate this Christmas season, we are asking everyone to keep an open ear and open heart to spread the word about the Paul Anderson Youth Home and connect us with the families of young men who are struggling with behavioral problems and issues of discipline, anger, and depression. Through our spiritual counseling, character development, and accelerated learning program, we share Christ with these young men. He is the one who transforms their lives for eternity. Our Christmas Extravaganza is one of the many celebrations held throughout the year to celebrate this important work.

ABOUT PAUL ANDERSON YOUTH HOME

Founded in 1961 by weightlifting world champion Paul Anderson and his wife, Glenda, the Paul Anderson Youth Home (PAYH) is a Christian residential program and on-campus school for young men between the ages of 16 and 21 struggling with behavioral problems and issues of discipline, anger and depression. PAYH is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF). In addition to counseling and character development, PAYH offers an accelerated learning program enabling residents to graduate with a high school diploma and technical certifications. To date, over 1,400 young men have attended the program. The Home is located at 1603 McIntosh St. in Vidalia, GA. To learn more about PAYH, call 912- 537-7237 or visit www.payh.org.

MEDIA CONTACT

Cynthia Cradduck

Cecilia Russo Marketing

cynthia@crussomarketing.com 

912-856-9075 


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Founders Day 2020
Nov 10, 2020

Paul Anderson Youth Home Honors Founders’ Memory and Heritage

Paul Anderson Youth Home Honors Founders’ Memory and Heritage
“The World’s Strongest Man” remembered for a foundation of faith during Founders’ Day celebration

(VIDALIA, GA) The staff and boys of the Paul Anderson Youth Home (PAYH) took a break from their schoolwork and daily routine to honor the legacy of Olympic gold medalist weightlifter Paul Anderson and to celebrate his and Glenda’s obedience to our Heavenly Father’s calling on their lives, to work with young men who made poor decisions and began a downward spiral.

Founded in 1961, PAYH is a Christian residential program and on-campus school dedicated to providing an alternative home setting and a positive opportunity for struggling young men between the ages of 16 and 21.

Held each October to commemorate Paul’s birthday, Founders’ Day is centered on prayer, feats of strength and group cooperation. A morning of prayer on the knoll where Anderson is buried was followed by an 11 a.m. brunch. In the afternoon, the young men split into teams for the physical activities.

Dubbed “The World’s Strongest Man,” Paul Anderson was as strong in faith as he was in body. He founded PAYH with his wife, Glenda Anderson, who continues to serve as President. They envisioned a Christ-centered residential refuge for young men with behavioral problems struggling with issues of discipline, substance abuse, anger and depression. To date, over 1,400 young men who have attended the accelerated learning, technical training and counseling program serve as testaments to the institution’s success.

“Each year this celebration reminds us of the bedrock we stand upon,” said Glenda Anderson. “Prayer was essential to Paul’s journey and to saving the lives of our boys. With the Home’s 60th anniversary just around the corner, our duty to Paul, and to the young men we serve, is to ensure it remains so.”

With a theme of rejuvenation, this year the young men were allowed to sleep in a bit before praying for the home’s residents, staff, families, devoted philanthropic partners, those affected by the coronavirus and the future of our world.

Following the service, the young men learned more about the history of PAYH from Eddie Burris, a former resident now serving as Director of Plant Operations. Along with his wife Betty, Vice President of Outreach and Compliance, they have worked at the home for over 50 years. After a mid-day meal, the day concluded with logrolling races, hurling weights and carrying stacks of bricks to spell out words.“There is nothing so restorative as prayer, reflection and physical activity,” said Glenda. “This is exactly how Paul would have wanted to be remembered.”

Paul-Anderson-Youth-Home-Christian-Residential-Program-and-On-Campus-School-in-Vidalia-Georgia
Paul-Anderson-Youth-Home-Christian-Residential-Program-and-On-Campus-School-in-Vidalia-Georgia
Paul-Anderson-Youth-Home-Christian-Residential-Program-and-On-Campus-School-in-Vidalia-Georgia

ABOUT PAUL ANDERSON YOUTH HOME
Founded in 1961 by weightlifting world champion Paul Anderson and his wife, Glenda, the Paul Anderson Youth Home (PAYH) is a Christian residential program and on-campus school for young men between the ages of 16 and 21 struggling with behavioral problems and issues of discipline, anger and depression. PAYH is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF). In addition to counseling and character development, PAYH offers an accelerated learning program enabling residents to graduate with a high school diploma and technical certifications. To date, over 1,400 young men have attended the program. The Home is located at 1603 McIntosh St. in Vidalia, GA. To learn more about PAYH, call (912) 537-7237 or visit www.payh.org.

MEDIA CONTACT
Cynthia Cradduck
Cecilia Russo Marketing
cynthia@crussomarketing.com
912-856-9075


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THE MINISTRY EXPANDS
Oct 17, 2020

The Legacy of Paul Anderson

88 years ago today, a champion was born. After overcoming Bright’s Disease as a young child, Paul Anderson went on to win the 1956 Melbourne Olympics before founding the Paul Anderson Youth Home. This year, as we prepare to celebrate 60 years of operation, we look back and remember the life, legacy, and selfless sacrifice of our PAYH Founder.


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Payh Blog
Nov 19, 2019

Thanking God For You

$Blog Post | Paul Anderson Youth Home


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Payh Blog
Apr 16, 2019

Jackson

A Changed Life is Priceless!

At PAYH, Jackson learned that his anger and addiction issues were symptoms of a much greater problem – the fact that he lacked a relationship with God. While he had previously been a “deliberate non-believer,” that came to an end in November when the Holy Spirit moved upon his heart and Jackson came face to face with the reality of his sin and his need for Christ.
You can help more young men like Jackson have a second chance and find hope in Christ through your investment in Paul Anderson Youth Home. You can help to change a life for eternity!
A changed life is priceless!


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Payh Blog
Nov 19, 2018

Thanking God For You!

A Changed Life is Priceless!

The difference God made in Hunter’s life at PAYH is invaluable. It is impossible to thank you enough for how you have helped to make this kind of life-changing transformation possible through your investment in God’s Kingdom.


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teen boy leaning on tree
Mar 05, 2018

Talking to Your Son About Drugs

Teen substance abuse has been a national issue for decades because of its impact on children, their physical and mental health, education, and the entire family. Whether they are considering using or not, talking to your son about drugs isn’t easy. It takes fearlessness to bring up his substance abuse risks. If you haven’t already had a conversation with him about drugs, now is the time. Talking now could decrease the chances of having to seek help for a problem down the road.
First, let’s start with some alarming numbers:

So, here’s some advice to help make a conversation about drug use with your son a little less uncomfortable.
Set aside time to talk.
The last thing you want to do is catch your son off-guard when he is distracted and less likely to want to have this important conversation. If you and your son set the time and place for the discussion, there’s a good chance he’ll be more actively engaged. Don’t worry that asking about drug use may cause him to experiment with an illicit substance. A University of Washington Social Development Research Group study found no evidence that children will use a substance just because you asked about it.
Make it clear that you are anti-drug.
While there is no magical way to prevent kids from trying drugs, CASA discovered that teens who say their parents “would not be extremely upset if they found out their child smoked, drank used marijuana are 8.5 times more likely to say it’s okay for teens their age to use marijuana – as compared to teens who say their parents would be “extremely upset (34% vs. 4%). In other words, saying that you are against drugs and would be distressed about your kids taking them can prevent them from taking drugs. So being clear about how you feel about drug use makes a difference.
Talk about drug use early and often.
Kids are never too young to begin having this conversation. When it comes to talking to tweens, KidsHealth recommends discussing drug use in an open, non-judgmental way by asking them what they think about drugs. Partnership for Drug-Free Kids suggests using celebrity addiction stories and headlines as teachable moments to show the consequences of alcohol and drug use.
Honesty is the best policy.
Parents’ opinions do sway their teens, even if it doesn’t always seem that way. Talk honestly with your children about the negatives of drug use and the positives of not experimenting. Remember to be a role model – even if that means being honest about your past drug or alcohol use and what you learned from those experiences.
Ask for help when you need it.
If you find that you truly do not feel comfortable having this conversation with your kids, it’s best to call a professional. A family counselor can sit with you both to help have a heartfelt and meaningful discussion, rather than just sitting in awkward silences or getting into a fight that could cause more harm than good.
The Paul Anderson Youth Home is a Christian transformative organization that recreates healthy homes through enduring relationships, routines, and tough love. Since 1961, we have been shaping men of character. We want to offer a fresh start for troubled teenagers who need to change their lives and have reached a “dead end. For parents in crisis, the PAYH is a sanctuary. Contact us at 1-800-559-PAYH (7294) or visit our website at payh.org to see how we can help.


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Eye Of The Hurricane
Oct 03, 2017

In the Eye of the Storm

Last month, Hurricane Irma came crashing in with some of the strongest winds ever seen in an Atlantic hurricane, and maintaining category 5 intensity longer than any storm previous. It generated more power than the 8 named storms of the Atlantic hurricane season (Arlene-Harvey) that came before (including Hurricane Harvey), prompting seven million people to evacuate. It left about 5.6 million Florida residents, two-thirds of the state’s homes, were without power. The storm is responsible for at least 68 deaths in the Caribbean and the Southeast. It has been three weeks since the catastrophic storm, but many areas are still in ruins, and some people are still missing.
Reading statistics like this can make God seem distant and harsh. How could He allow such devastation? What good could possibly come from a parent losing their child, a child losing their parent, homes being destroyed, lives being uprooted, worlds being turned upside down?
Reflecting on all of this reminds me of Steve Saint’s story. Many of you are familiar with it, or rather the story of Jim Elliot. Steve’s father, Nate, was one of the five missionaries, including Jim Elliot, who were killed trying to evangelize the Huaorani people through efforts known as “Operation Auca. You may have seen the movie, End of the Spear, which told their story. Steve was only five years old when his father was brutally murdered by the Huaorani tribe. Nate, Jim, and their three friends knew that the Huaorani people were killing the employees of an oil company that was moving in on their land, but they didn’t know that the tribe habitually killed their own members. In fact, anthropologists have never studied a tribe with a higher homicide rate than the Huaorani, and more than 60% of the tribe’s members were speared to death or killed with machetes by their own people. In short, this was an extremely violent and deadly group of people that Nate and the crew were trying to reach for Jesus. After what seemed to be a promising start to their mission, all five missionaries were brutally speared and murdered with machetes then thrown in to the river to be eaten. Five-year-old Steve was left with confusion, heartbreak, and doubt when his mother told him that his father wasn’t returning home.
But Steve’s story doesn’t stop there. Years later, after three sons, his wife gave birth to a little girl. When she went away to college, a group called Youth for Christ asked her to travel around the world with them for a year and share the Gospel. Steve did not want her to go; he wanted her home with him. Nonetheless, she left, and the painful year of separation for Steve came and went. The day they picked her up from the Orlando airport was a joyous one, and they headed home for her welcome home party. During the party, she retired to her bedroom with a headache. Steve and his wife left everyone else celebrating their daughter’s return and went to be with her in her room. As Steve was holding her in his arms and praying for her aloud, she had a massive cerebral hemorrhage. When they got to the hospital, the doctors told Steve and his wife that there was no hope for recovery for their only daughter, their baby girl.
Steve has had a hard life. I don’t think anyone would deny that after hearing his story. However, he has one of the most radically challenging views on suffering that I have ever encountered. He says,
“If we are going to emulate our Savior, we have to identify with the people to whom we take his good news. I don’t advocate that we look for suffering; life brings enough of it on its own. But what I do advocate is that suffering is an important prerequisite to ministering to hurting people. Christ took on our likeness and subjected himself to the suffering that plagues us. I am convinced that we should not make heroic efforts and expend vast resources like the rest of our society does to avoid suffering. Not only would a willingness to experience hurt give us credibility with suffering people, but it would also give God a special opportunity to prove his sufficiency to meet our needs. As [C.S. Lewis] said, ‘God whispers to us in our pleasures, speaks in our conscience, but shouts in our pains: It is his megaphone to rouse a deaf world.’
I like the way Steve says it above, but he is simply reiterating James 1:2-4, which says, “Consider it pure joy, my brothers and sisters, whenever you face trials of many kinds, because you know that the testing of your faith produces perseverance. Let perseverance finish its work so that you may be mature and complete, not lacking anything. Our human nature hates any kind of suffering because it is uncomfortable. Of course, we would rather our loved ones and ourselves be safe, happy, and thriving. The reality is, however, that many of us tuck God away when things are going well in our lives. We feel like we have things under control, so we don’t think we need Him as much…until things get bad, and then we run back to Him. James says that trails should make us joyous! They draw us close to God and make us more like Him. That is a good thing, not something we should avoid at all costs like we tend to do!
Steve poses a great question: “Why is it that we want every chapter to be good when God promises only that in the last chapter He will make all the other chapters make sense, and He doesn’t promise we’ll see that last chapter here? When the literal and metaphorical hurricanes come crashing into our lives, we must remind ourselves that we don’t have the whole picture, but God does. It may not make sense to us now, but we can trust that He is using our trials to sanctify us because He loves us. This doesn’t negate the pain of our sufferings and losses, but it does give purpose to them. Not only do we gain the privilege of growing closer to and more like God in a way that we wouldn’t be able to if we had not experienced our pain, but we also discover the ability to empathize with other hurting individuals and show them the love of Christ in a new way. We can understand their hurt, and we know Who to point them to. Hold on to His assured hope and embrace your ability to love others in a new way!


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Hunter
Sep 25, 2017

Hunter


Hunter’s life is a story of change, hope, and redemption. Through the work God is doing at PAYH, God has radically transformed his life, and he will never be the same. Listen as he takes a few minutes to share his powerful testimony.
A changed life is PRICELESS!


Priceless
Priceless


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